Most important questions about Tifoo Anodising kits

On this page, we want to answer some of the most important questions about the subject "Anodising with Tifoo Anodising Kits & Dyes".

What does the term "anodising" mean?

When we use the term "anodising", we talk about the electrolytic oxidation of aluminium. By dipping the aluminium into an electrolytic bath, it and many of its alloys will obtain an oxide layer (aluminium oxide). This layer has an anti-corrosive effect and protects the material. Additionally, unlike pure aluminium, the created oxide layer can be dyed, this is called coloured anodising.

Does the anodising process also work on other metals?

Colour anodising basically works best for aluminium and titan. Many common metals like silver, gold, iron or copper CAN NOT be anodised.

In which colours can you anodise aluminium?

Aluminium and many of its alloys can be dyed in different colours. Our product range offers you a selection of the most important anodizing dyes. Depending on the concentration at which you mix the dyes into distilled water, you can achieve many shades of the corresponding colour. An overview of our colours and corresponding shades can be seen on our Tifoo Anodising colour chart >>>

Is it possible to anodise in white colour?
One colour that is impossible to achieve by anodising aluminium is white. This process would be particularly interesting for the space flight industry, but until now, there has been no method found that achieves white anodised components (as far as we know; if you know of novel development in this direction we would be happy if you let us know).

What is the difference between "normal" anodising of aluminium and hard anodized aluminum?
"Normal" anodising works at room temperature and relatively low current and can achieve layer thicknesses of 10 to 15 µm. This layer thickness is enough for the majority of applications and for sufficient corrosion protection. For industrial purposes or in particularly corrosive places, thicker layers of over 100 µm may be necessary. This is where hard anodising with significantly higher currents comes into play. Due to these high current intensities, the workpieces contacted as anode will become very hot. This is why hard anodizing needs a sufficient cooling of the anodising bath.

On this page, we want to answer some of the most important questions about the subject "Anodising with Tifoo Anodising Kits & Dyes". What does the term "anodising" mean? When we use the... read more »
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Most important questions about Tifoo Anodising kits

On this page, we want to answer some of the most important questions about the subject "Anodising with Tifoo Anodising Kits & Dyes".

What does the term "anodising" mean?

When we use the term "anodising", we talk about the electrolytic oxidation of aluminium. By dipping the aluminium into an electrolytic bath, it and many of its alloys will obtain an oxide layer (aluminium oxide). This layer has an anti-corrosive effect and protects the material. Additionally, unlike pure aluminium, the created oxide layer can be dyed, this is called coloured anodising.

Does the anodising process also work on other metals?

Colour anodising basically works best for aluminium and titan. Many common metals like silver, gold, iron or copper CAN NOT be anodised.

In which colours can you anodise aluminium?

Aluminium and many of its alloys can be dyed in different colours. Our product range offers you a selection of the most important anodizing dyes. Depending on the concentration at which you mix the dyes into distilled water, you can achieve many shades of the corresponding colour. An overview of our colours and corresponding shades can be seen on our Tifoo Anodising colour chart >>>

Is it possible to anodise in white colour?
One colour that is impossible to achieve by anodising aluminium is white. This process would be particularly interesting for the space flight industry, but until now, there has been no method found that achieves white anodised components (as far as we know; if you know of novel development in this direction we would be happy if you let us know).

What is the difference between "normal" anodising of aluminium and hard anodized aluminum?
"Normal" anodising works at room temperature and relatively low current and can achieve layer thicknesses of 10 to 15 µm. This layer thickness is enough for the majority of applications and for sufficient corrosion protection. For industrial purposes or in particularly corrosive places, thicker layers of over 100 µm may be necessary. This is where hard anodising with significantly higher currents comes into play. Due to these high current intensities, the workpieces contacted as anode will become very hot. This is why hard anodizing needs a sufficient cooling of the anodising bath.

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